UK Protection of Freedoms Act Makes Changes in FOI

11 May 2012

By Paul Gibbons

This article first appeared in FOIManUK on May 10, Gibbon’s blog, and is reprinted with permission.

The Protection of Freedoms Act came into force on 1 May 2012. Amongst its many implications are those for the Freedom of Information Act (though we still await a commencement order in respect of these provisions, so it is not yet clear when they will come into force). I previously wrote about this when the Bill was first published early last year, but now that it has entered the statute books, it is time to see what the approved legislation requires.

Part 6 of the Act covers the freedom of information and data protection changes. Section 102 amends section 11 of FOI to the following effect:

  • where a public authority is asked for information that is in the form of a dataset (defined in the new section 11(5) – or s.102(2)(c) of PoFA), and the requester asks for it in electronic form, as far as is reasonably practicable (explained at s.11(2) of the existing FOI Act), the public authority must disclose the dataset in a re-usable format.

A new section 11A:

  • requires that where the copyright of a disclosed dataset belongs to the public authority, it will be subject to a licence to be specified by the Secretary of State (presumably Justice) in the Section 45 Code of Practice (a new revision of which, we assume, must be forthcoming);
  • allows an authority to charge a fee for re-use in line with section 11B or any other regulations that provide for a fee to be charged for re-use;
  • requires an authority to issue a fees notice to an applicant where it is planning to charge for re-use;
  • removes the obligation to allow re-use until such a fee has been paid.

And section 11B:

  • empowers the Secretary of State (again, presumably Justice), in consultation with the Treasury, to establish fees for re-use of datasets through regulations;
  • these regulations would apply to datasets disclosed in response to FOI requests and listed in a public authority’s publication scheme.

Talking of publication schemes, public authorities will be obliged to publish datasets disclosed in response to FOI requests in their publication schemes unless they are satisfied that it is not appropriate. They will also have to publish updated versions when they change. Section 19 of FOI has been amended to this effect (it now includes a section 19(2A-F)).

Section 45 has been updated to require the Secretary of State to make provision in the Code of Practice for disclosure of datasets.

Section 103 of the Protection of Freedoms Act closes down the loophole in the coverage of FOI for bodies established by two or more public authorities by amending section 6 of FOI.

Section 104 extends certain provisions of FOI that hitherto had not applied to Northern Ireland to that jurisdiction.

Section 105 amends both the Data Protection Act and FOI to extend the Information Commissioner’s term of office from 5 to 7 years, and limit those appointed to the post to one term.

Section 107 amends section 47(4) of FOI allowing the Information Commissioner to charge for “relevant services” – training, multiple copies of published material, and conferences – without consulting the Secretary of State (as he was obliged to do previously).

In summary:

  • public authorities are obliged to make datasets available in a re-usable format on request;
  • re-use will be allowed under the terms of licence(s) to be announced, and charging will probably be allowed in line with existing or new regulations;
  • disclosed datasets will normally have to be published (and kept up-to-date) under an authority’s publication scheme;
  • publicly-owned companies owned by more than one public authority will no longer escape FOI;
  • Information Commissioners will serve only one 7-year term; and
  • expect the Information Commissioner’s Office to start charging for training and conferences.

Not much has changed on this aspect of the Act since the first draft over a year ago. We now need to watch out for the commencement order bringing these changes into force, the revised section 45 Code of Practice, and any regulations on charging for re-use.

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